UNDARA VOLCANIC NATIONAL PARK
Location: 100 kilometres south-west of Mount Garnet
Undara means ‘long way’ in Aboriginal language This national park is part of the McBride volcanic province with 164 volcanoes. There has been eruption after eruption in this land during the last seven to eight million years, the last one less than 20,000 years ago.
The photo on the right was taken from the rim of Kalkani Volcano. Commissioner's Cap volcano can be seen at the centre.
Undara was the protagonist of the largest single volcano eruption on Earth about 190,000 years ago, when the external layer of the 1200°C lava flowing along a river bed cooled down and became a crust, while massive internal volumes kept on spreading producing  hollow tubes of about 20 metres wide and 10 metres high.
View of the tube's wall. There is a boardwalk to allow visitors a clear view of all the important geological features.
Awe-inspiring landscape. Visitors are requested not to come in contact with these rocks, which have been undisturbed for millions of years.
Up to 40 wildlife species have benefited from the shelter created in tubes where the top area collapsed producing more than 50 caves.
The guide points his torch at this strange heart-like formation, describing it as a significant spot for romance.
Insect-eating bats and rock wallabies as well as some 120 types of birds are common to this area. There are two geological tunnel sections, the longest one up to 28 kilometres long and the other 16 kilometres, both running under the rainforest.
Walking out of the tube into natural light, after experiencing first-hand a unique geological marvel.
Mr Geoffrey Bartlett from Adelaide with wife Lill and sister-in-law Jo Wall de Gallo from Mount Garnet, visiting the Undara Volcanic National Park.
For more detailed information visit Undara Experience
UNDARA VOLCANIC NATIONAL PARK
Location: 100 kilometres south-west of Mount Garnet
Undara means ‘long way’ in Aboriginal language This national park is part of the McBride volcanic province with 164 volcanoes. There has been eruption after eruption in this land during the last seven to eight million years, the last one less than 20,000 years ago.
The photo on the right was taken from the rim of Kalkani Volcano. Commissioner's Cap volcano can be seen at the centre.
Undara was the protagonist of the largest single volcano eruption on Earth about 190,000 years ago, when the external layer of the 1200°C lava flowing along a river bed cooled down and became a crust, while massive internal volumes kept on spreading producing  hollow tubes of about 20 metres wide and 10 metres high.
View of the tube's wall. There is a boardwalk to allow visitors a clear view of all the important geological features.
Up to 40 wildlife species have benefited from the shelter created in tubes where the top area collapsed producing more than 50 caves.
Awe-inspiring landscape. Visitors are requested not to come in contact with these rocks, which have been undisturbed for millions of years.
The guide points his torch at this strange heart-like formation, describing it as a significant spot for romance.
Insect-eating bats and rock wallabies as well as some 120 types of birds are common to this area. There are two geological tunnel sections, the longest one up to 28 kilometres long and the other 16 kilometres, both running under the rainforest.
Walking out of the tube into natural light, after experiencing first-hand a unique geological marvel.
Mr Geoffrey Bartlett from Adelaide with wife Lill and sister-in-law Jo Wall de Gallo from Mount Garnet, visiting the Undara Volcanic National Park.
For more detailed information visit Undara Experience
UNDARA VOLCANIC NATIONAL PARK
Location: 100 kilometres south-west of Mount Garnet
The photo on above was taken from the rim of Kalkani Volcano. Commissioner's Cap volcano can be seen at the centre.
Undara was the protagonist of the largest single volcano eruption on Earth about 190,000 years ago, when the external layer of the 1200°C lava flowing along a river bed cooled down and became a crust, while massive internal volumes kept on spreading producing  hollow tubes of about 20 metres wide and 10 metres high.
View of the tube's wall. There is a boardwalk to allow visitors a clear view of all the important geological features.
Up to 40 wildlife species have benefited from the shelter created in tubes where the top area collapsed producing more than 50 caves.
Awe-inspiring landscape. Visitors are requested not to come in contact with these rocks, which have been undisturbed for millions of years.
The guide points his torch at this strange heart-like formation, describing it as a significant spot for romance.
Insect-eating bats and rock wallabies as well as some 120 types of birds are common to this area. There are two geological tunnel sections, the longest one up to 28 kilometres long and the other 16 kilometres, both running under the rainforest.
Walking out of the tube into natural light, after experiencing first-hand a unique geological marvel.
Mr Geoffrey Bartlett from Adelaide with wife Lill and sister-in-law Jo Wall de Gallo from Mount Garnet, visiting the Undara Volcanic National Park.
For more detailed information visit Undara Experience