PEOPLE AND HISTORY OF MOUNT GARNET
Some of my Recollections of Life at Mt Garnet By Doreen Newell, nee Jewell Resident from 1934 to 1942 Aged 4 to 12 years. My mother Maud Jewell, my sister Jean and I left Bobawaba 1934. My mother was the Station Mistress there from 1932, to take up the promotion to Station Mistress at Mt Garnet. My mother was a young widow. Jean continued her schooling there after starting as a correspondent student at Bobawaba. I started later when I turned five, in 1935. We had one teacher, just a small school then, with two custard apple trees aside the steps.
Mount Garnet State School - Photo of Students 1936 The school had a fancy dress ball once a year, and we had a big sports day. Everyone had a wonderful life and we were all friendly. When you had a birthday party you didn’t ask anyone to come, everyone just turned up with presents. Mr Biggs was our schoolteacher and his wife taught our Sunday school. Mr Biggs used to do the church service on Sundays. Sometimes the C of E minister would come from Herberton on a horse, to perform the service. Mr. & Mrs. Lucey had the hotel and the butcher shop and the big tin shed where we had dances and pictures. The picture reels came by train once a week from Cairns. The train came up one day and the engine would be turned around on the turn-table. Jean & I loved to watch this – the crew wouldMum in front of the living quarters at the Station stay overnight then drive the train back the next day.
Mum in front of the living quarters at the Station.
Mum, Jean and me in front of the station office, ready to go to church.
Allandorf’s had the other hotel across the road, but it burnt down a long time ago. Mr & Mrs McDonald had the café and small shop. We would buy our fresh bread the day after it arrived on the train from Dimbulah. Otherwise the women had to make their own. The ice would come on the train from Dimbulah. All the kids would wait for the train to come in and then we would follow Mr McDonald to the shop and watch him churn the ice cream before the ice melted. We had ice cream once a week. Mt Garnet had races once a year and then the big ball that night. All the ladies had beautiful long dresses. The kids were put behind the piano to sleep. We had one policeman, Sergeant Lyons, who had a very nice wife, and son, Jock. Jock was our schoolteacher until he enlisted in WWII. Sergeant used to ride a horse. Mr Cook had a truck; he would go over to Herberton and bring back fruit and veggies. If you had to visit a doctor or dentist he would take you over and wait for you. There was a hospital, a big house really with verandahs on three sides. Our matron was Matron Edna McKenzie; she later married Mr Roberts from Garnet. She looked after people for minor complaints, but for serious complaints had to go to Herberton Hospital. One time I got sick and Mr Cook took me to the Herberton hospital when I was seven, while mum had to stay behind and work. I cried all the way over – I had to stay there for one week – life was hard too. Mum would buy material for our clothes at Jack and Newell’s and also our groceries. We had catalogues from Brisbane for clothes and shoes and linen. The goods would come COD then the money had to be sent to whatever shop we dealt from. Mum married my stepfather, Ken Moffat, in St David’s church in 1939, then we moved to Tableland Tin (now Tabo). Mum had to resign from the Railways, as they employed no married women then. My sister, Carol Moffat was born in 1940. Mum had to go to Atherton Hospital for her birth.
L to R Jean, Ken Moffat, Mum, me with Carol on Ken’s knee. Oh yes, and the Peterson’s dog!!
Our Tabo house.
Marjorie Peterson and I with our dog, Toby - 1941 The house had a tin roof and hessian walls that we whitewashed. The floor was rammed earth. We had a veggie garden and flowers too, all fenced off. We were there for a few years then moved to Brisbane in 1942 as the Japanese moved closer to our country. I can remember the McKenna families, Roberts, Smiths, Whites, Cooks Edwards and Allandorf girls. Jean and I would go to Mrs Lucey’s property for the weekend sometimes. Our best friends were the twins Vera and Veva Smith, Erin and the McKenna kids.
L to R – Me, Vera, Jean and Veva with our dolls we got for Christmas 1936 The twins also had their birthday on Christmas Day.
Mt Garnet was a magic place for my sister and I because we were so happy. We went back for a visit about 1996 and met up with Erin Lucey, one of our childhood playmates. It was so nice to see her again. Jean has passed away now after a long illness.
L to R - Me, Erin Lucey and Jean 1995
The railway bridge over Return Creek
L to R Jean, me, Erin, Mr Jim Flood and three girls I cannot remember now In front of the railway platform (note rail line just behind the car wheels)
Main Street of Mt Garnet looking up the hill to the school on the left.
PEOPLE AND HISTORY OF MOUNT GARNET
Some of my Recollections of Life at Mt Garnet By Doreen Newell, nee Jewell Resident from 1934 to 1942 Aged 4 to 12 years. My mother Maud Jewell, my sister Jean and I left Bobawaba 1934. My mother was the Station Mistress there from 1932, to take up the promotion to Station Mistress at Mt Garnet. My mother was a young widow. Jean continued her schooling there after starting as a correspondent student at Bobawaba. I started later when I turned five, in 1935. We had one teacher, just a small school then, with two custard apple trees aside the steps.
Mount Garnet State School - Photo of Students 1936 The school had a fancy dress ball once a year, and we had a big sports day. Everyone had a wonderful life and we were all friendly. When you had a birthday party you didn’t ask anyone to come, everyone just turned up with presents. Mr Biggs was our schoolteacher and his wife taught our Sunday school. Mr Biggs used to do the church service on Sundays. Sometimes the C of E minister would come from Herberton on a horse, to perform the service. Mr. & Mrs. Lucey had the hotel and the butcher shop and the big tin shed where we had dances and pictures. The picture reels came by train once a week from Cairns. The train came up one day and the engine would be turned around on the turn-table. Jean & I loved to watch this – the crew wouldMum in front of the living quarters at the Station stay overnight then drive the train back the next day.
Mum in front of the living quarters at the Station.
Mum, Jean and me in front of the station office, ready to go to church.
Allandorf’s had the other hotel across the road, but it burnt down a long time ago. Mr & Mrs McDonald had the café and small shop. We would buy our fresh bread the day after it arrived on the train from Dimbulah. Otherwise the women had to make their own. The ice would come on the train from Dimbulah. All the kids would wait for the train to come in and then we would follow Mr McDonald to the shop and watch him churn the ice cream before the ice melted. We had ice cream once a week. Mt Garnet had races once a year and then the big ball that night. All the ladies had beautiful long dresses. The kids were put behind the piano to sleep. We had one policeman, Sergeant Lyons, who had a very nice wife, and son, Jock. Jock was our schoolteacher until he enlisted in WWII. Sergeant used to ride a horse. Mr Cook had a truck; he would go over to Herberton and bring back fruit and veggies. If you had to visit a doctor or dentist he would take you over and wait for you. There was a hospital, a big house really with verandahs on three sides. Our matron was Matron Edna McKenzie; she later married Mr Roberts from Garnet. She looked after people for minor complaints, but for serious complaints had to go to Herberton Hospital. One time I got sick and Mr Cook took me to the Herberton hospital when I was seven, while mum had to stay behind and work. I cried all the way over – I had to stay there for one week – life was hard too. Mum would buy material for our clothes at Jack and Newell’s and also our groceries. We had catalogues from Brisbane for clothes and shoes and linen. The goods would come COD then the money had to be sent to whatever shop we dealt from. Mum married my stepfather, Ken Moffat, in St David’s church in 1939, then we moved to Tableland Tin (now Tabo). Mum had to resign from the Railways, as they employed no married women then. My sister, Carol Moffat was born in 1940. Mum had to go to Atherton Hospital for her birth.
L to R Jean, Ken Moffat, Mum, me with Carol on Ken’s knee. Oh yes, and the Peterson’s dog!!
Our Tabo house.
Marjorie Peterson and I with our dog, Toby - 1941
The house had a tin roof and hessian walls that we whitewashed. The floor was rammed earth. We had a veggie garden and flowers too, all fenced off. We were there for a few years then moved to Brisbane in 1942 as the Japanese moved closer to our country. I can remember the McKenna families, Roberts, Smiths, Whites, Cooks Edwards and Allandorf girls. Jean and I would go to Mrs Lucey’s property for the weekend sometimes. Our best friends were the twins Vera and Veva Smith, Erin and the McKenna kids.
L to R – Me, Vera, Jean and Veva with our dolls we got for Christmas 1936 The twins also had their birthday on Christmas Day.
Mt Garnet was a magic place for my sister and I because we were so happy. We went back for a visit about 1996 and met up with Erin Lucey, one of our childhood playmates. It was so nice to see her again. Jean has passed away now after a long illness.
L to R - Me, Erin Lucey and Jean 1995
The railway bridge over Return Creek
L to R Jean, me, Erin, Mr Jim Flood and three girls I cannot remember now In front of the railway platform (note rail line just behind the car wheels)
Main Street of Mt Garnet looking up the hill to the school on the left.
PEOPLE AND HISTORY OF MOUNT GARNET
Some of my Recollections of Life at Mt Garnet By Doreen Newell, nee Jewell Resident from 1934 to 1942 Aged 4 to 12 years. My mother Maud Jewell, my sister Jean and I left Bobawaba 1934. My mother was the Station Mistress there from 1932, to take up the promotion to Station Mistress at Mt Garnet. My mother was a young widow. Jean continued her schooling there after starting as a correspondent student at Bobawaba. I started later when I turned five, in 1935. We had one teacher, just a small school then, with two custard apple trees aside the steps.
Mount Garnet State School Photo of Students 1936 The school had a fancy dress ball once a year, and we had a big sports day. Everyone had a wonderful life and we were all friendly. When you had a birthday party you didn’t ask anyone to come, everyone just turned up with presents. Mr Biggs was our schoolteacher and his wife taught our Sunday school. Mr Biggs used to do the church service on Sundays. Sometimes the C of E minister would come from Herberton on a horse, to perform the service. Mr. & Mrs. Lucey had the hotel and the butcher shop and the big tin shed where we had dances and pictures. The picture reels came by train once a week from Cairns. The train came up one day and the engine would be turned around on the turn-table. Jean & I loved to watch this – the crew wouldMum in front of the living quarters at the Station stay overnight then drive the train back the next day.
Mum in front of the living quarters at the Station.
Mum, Jean and me in front of the station office, ready to go to church.
Allandorf’s had the other hotel across the road, but it burnt down a long time ago. Mr & Mrs McDonald had the café and small shop. We would buy our fresh bread the day after it arrived on the train from Dimbulah. Otherwise the women had to make their own. The ice would come on the train from Dimbulah. All the kids would wait for the train to come in and then we would follow Mr McDonald to the shop and watch him churn the ice cream before the ice melted. We had ice cream once a week. Mt Garnet had races once a year and then the big ball that night. All the ladies had beautiful long dresses. The kids were put behind the piano to sleep. We had one policeman, Sergeant Lyons, who had a very nice wife, and son, Jock. Jock was our schoolteacher until he enlisted in WWII. Sergeant used to ride a horse. Mr Cook had a truck; he would go over to Herberton and bring back fruit and veggies. If you had to visit a doctor or dentist he would take you over and wait for you. There was a hospital, a big house really with verandahs on three sides. Our matron was Matron Edna McKenzie; she later married Mr Roberts from Garnet. She looked after people for minor complaints, but for serious complaints had to go to Herberton Hospital. One time I got sick and Mr Cook took me to the Herberton hospital when I was seven, while mum had to stay behind and work. I cried all the way over – I had to stay there for one week – life was hard too. Mum would buy material for our clothes at Jack and Newell’s and also our groceries. We had catalogues from Brisbane for clothes and shoes and linen. The goods would come COD then the money had to be sent to whatever shop we dealt from. Mum married my stepfather, Ken Moffat, in St David’s church in 1939, then we moved to Tableland Tin (now Tabo). Mum had to resign from the Railways, as they employed no married women then. My sister, Carol Moffat was born in 1940. Mum had to go to Atherton Hospital for her birth.
L to R Jean, Ken Moffat, Mum, me with Carol on Ken’s knee. Oh yes, and the Peterson’s dog!!
Our Tabo house.
Marjorie Peterson and I with our dog, Toby - 1941
The house had a tin roof and hessian walls that we whitewashed. The floor was rammed earth. We had a veggie garden and flowers too, all fenced off. We were there for a few years then moved to Brisbane in 1942 as the Japanese moved closer to our country. I can remember the McKenna families, Roberts, Smiths, Whites, Cooks Edwards and Allandorf girls. Jean and I would go to Mrs Lucey’s property for the weekend sometimes. Our best friends were the twins Vera and Veva Smith, Erin and the McKenna kids.
L to R – Me, Vera, Jean and Veva with our dolls we got for Christmas 1936 The twins also had their birthday on Christmas Day.
Mt Garnet was a magic place for my sister and I because we were so happy. We went back for a visit about 1996 and met up with Erin Lucey, one of our childhood playmates. It was so nice to see her again. Jean has passed away now after a long illness.
L to R - Me, Erin Lucey and Jean 1995
The railway bridge over Return Creek
L to R Jean, me, Erin, Mr Jim Flood and three girls I cannot remember now In front of the railway platform (note rail line just behind the car wheels)
Main Street of Mt Garnet looking up the hill to the school on the left.