PEOPLE AND HISTORY OF MOUNT GARNET
NYMBOOL, ALMOST JUST MEMORIES
Article and photos by Bev Bowe. 21 November 2007 The young couple who live in the old Post Office building are the only visible inhabitants of Nymbool, a tin mining town that welcomed progress in 1902 when the railway arrived. Six pubs helped to quench the thirst of the local population and the workers who built a branch of the Cairns to Chillagoe line, which started in Lappa Junction and eventually ended in Mount Garnet the same year. I had a powerful desire to return to Nymbool, to find out what traces remained of the existence of the once busy town just eight kilometres North West of Mount Garnet as the crow flies. My mother, Jean Edwards, was one of 13 children who lived in the town and only moved to Mount Garnet when she married my father. A pretty serene bush cemetery lies on a sandy ridge, surrounded by a sprinkle of pine and quinine trees, under a big iron bark. Odd calls from magpies and kurrawongs ring out for the solace of remains identified by the lone headstone set in that most beautiful place. But D. McKinley is not alone. William Buchanan who died on the 24th of March 1903 at the age of 3 and William Atkins who ceased to live on the 16th of May 1905 at the age of 70 give him company.
Nymbool cemetery.
Nymbool cemetery grave.
PEOPLE AND HISTORY OF MOUNT GARNET
NYMBOOL, ALMOST JUST MEMORIES
Article and photos by Bev Bowe. 21 November 2007 The young couple who live in the old Post Office building are the only visible inhabitants of Nymbool, a tin mining town that welcomed progress in 1902 when the railway arrived. Six pubs helped to quench the thirst of the local population and the workers who built a branch of the Cairns to Chillagoe line, which started in Lappa Junction and eventually ended in Mount Garnet the same year. I had a powerful desire to return to Nymbool, to find out what traces remained of the existence of the once busy town just eight kilometres North West of Mount Garnet as the crow flies. My mother, Jean Edwards, was one of 13 children who lived in the town and only moved to Mount Garnet when she married my father. A pretty serene bush cemetery lies on a sandy ridge, surrounded by a sprinkle of pine and quinine trees, under a big iron bark. Odd calls from magpies and kurrawongs ring out for the solace of remains identified by the lone headstone set in that most beautiful place. But D. McKinley is not alone. William Buchanan who died on the 24th of March 1903 at the age of 3 and William Atkins who ceased to live on the 16th of May 1905 at the age of 70 give him company. 
Nymbool cemetery.
Nymbool cemetery grave.
PEOPLE AND HISTORY OF MOUNT GARNET
NYMBOOL, ALMOST JUST MEMORIES
Article and photos by Bev Bowe. 21 November 2007 The young couple who live in the old Post Office building are the only visible inhabitants of Nymbool, a tin mining town that welcomed progress in 1902 when the railway arrived. Six pubs helped to quench the thirst of the local population and the workers who built a branch of the Cairns to Chillagoe line, which started in Lappa Junction and eventually ended in Mount Garnet the same year. I had a powerful desire to return to Nymbool, to find out what traces remained of the existence of the once busy town just eight kilometres North West of Mount Garnet as the crow flies. My mother, Jean Edwards, was one of 13 children who lived in the town and only moved to Mount Garnet when she married my father. A pretty serene bush cemetery lies on a sandy ridge, surrounded by a sprinkle of pine and quinine trees, under a big iron bark. Odd calls from magpies and kurrawongs ring out for the solace of remains identified by the lone headstone set in that most beautiful place. But D. McKinley is not alone. William Buchanan who died on the 24th of March 1903 at the age of 3 and William Atkins who ceased to live on the 16th of May 1905 at the age of 70 give him company. 
Nymbool cemetery.
Nymbool cemetery grave.